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Thoth/Hermes Trismegistus


Thoth is the name given by the Greeks to one of the Egyptian gods. Thoth was the god of wisdom, inventor of writing, patron of scribes and the divine mediator. He is most often represented as a man with the head of an ibis, holding a scribal palette and reed pen. He was shown as either an ibis or a baboon.

As with most Egyptian deities there were many different stories regarding the parentage of Thoth. Many sources call him the son of Re or Ra. . Re was known as the Egyptian sun god and creator god. He was usually depicted in human form with a falcon head, crowned with the sun disc encircled by the uraeus -a stylized representation of the sacred cobra. The sun itself was taken to be either his body or his eye. He was said to traverse the sky each day in a solar barque and pass through the underworld each night on another solar barque to reappear in the east each morning.

In Ancient Egyptian the word Thoth means "messenger". It is the name most commonly given to the ibis-headed god, the Messenger of Ra. From one aspect he was speech itself... In every legend in which Thoth takes a prominent part we see it is he who speaks the word that results in the wishes of Ra being carried into effect... Thoth was the patron divinity of wisdom. Myths concerning Thoth show him as a divinity whose counsel is always sought. Over time, he developed as a god of wisdom, and came to be associated with magic, music, medicine, astronomy, geometry, surveying, drawing and writing.

Thoth was also present at the judgement of the dead. He would question the deceased before recording the result of the weighing of the deceased's heart. If the result was favorable Thoth would declare the deceased as a righteous individual who was worthy of a blessed afterlife.

It is written in the ancient texts that Thoth also wrote a major work of scriptural importance that would one day be found. This Book had been lost, but one day the world will find it and understand its great significance. Thoth also served as a meditator among the gods. In the Osirian legend, he protected Isis during her pregnancy and healed her son Horus when Seth tore out his left eye.

Thoth was also a lunar deity, and whatever form he took he wore a lunar crescent on his head. Some Egyptologists think that the Egyptians identified the crescent moon with the curved beak of the ibis. He was known as the Egyptian Moon god. It is also suggested that the Egyptians observed that baboon was a nocturnal (i.e. lunar) animal who would greet the sun with chattering noises each morning. Thoth was depicted with a symbol combining the Sun's disk and the Moon's crescent upon his head, and - in words reminiscent of the biblical adoration of the Celestial Lord - the Egyptian inscriptions and legends said of Thoth that his knowledge and powers of calculating 'measured out the heavens and planned the Earth'.

Hermes Trismegistos
Since he was messenger of the gods Thoth was identified by the Greeks with their own god Hermes, in the form of Hermes Trismegistos (Hermes the thrice great), in which form he remained popular in medieval magic and alchemy. For this reason Thoth's center of worship is still known to us today as Hermopolis. They described Hermes as the inventor of astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. He was the first to establish a system of theology, and invented the letters of the alphabet and writing. The whole of the Book of the Dead is assumed to be the composition of Thoth... The character of Thoth is a lofty conception and is perhaps the highest idea fashioned in the Egyptian mind.


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